Main Menu


How to Finish a Basement Bathroom – Part 13

How to Finish a Basement Bathroom – Install the bathroom vanity and connect the plumbing for the faucet and sink drain. This project is continued from How to Finish a Basement Bathroom – Part 12.

Basement Bathroom Vanity and Mirror

Basement Bathroom Vanity and Mirror

The bathroom vanity and matching mirror were purchased at Home Depot.

Basement Bathroom Vanity Combo Kit

The vanity comes preassembled in a large and somewhat heavy box:

Basement Bathroom: Vanity Shipping Carton

Basement Bathroom: Vanity Shipping Carton

Unpacking reveals the vanity cabinet and cultured marble sink:

Bathroom Vanity Sink and Cabinet

Bathroom Vanity Sink and Cabinet

The vanity cabinet is temporarily set in place by the plumbing connections against the wall. The open back of the cabinet provides a large space for the copper water pipes and PVC drain pipe. The marble vanity top is then laid on top of the cabinet. The vanity cabinet is not fastened to the 2×4 wall studs with wood screws at this point.

Basement Bathroom Vanity Cabinet Plumbing Rough-In

Basement Bathroom Vanity Cabinet Plumbing Rough-In

Install Basement Bathroom Sink Faucet

I chose an American Standard Williamsburg faucet based on the style. It comes complete with the Speed Connect drain “1/3 the parts, connects in 1/3 the time” that I really liked.

American Standard Williamsburg Faucet

American Standard Williamsburg Faucet

The faucet kit consist of:

  • Faucet
  • Speed Connect drain
  • Alternate style of metal handles should you not like the white porcelain ones
  • Plastic mounting nuts
  • Installation Instructions
Basement Bathroom Faucet Components

Basement Bathroom Faucet Components

The faucet installs on the sink by inserting it through the mounting holes:

Finish a Basement Bathroom: Install the Faucet

Finish a Basement Bathroom: Install the Faucet

The faucet is held in place by the two black plastic wing nuts threaded on the hot and cold brass shanks (top of photo). The nuts are tightened by hand – no tools required. The next photo is looking up from inside the vanity cabinet.

Basement Bathroom Faucet Installation: Bottom of Faucet and Mount Nuts

Basement Bathroom Faucet Installation: Bottom of Faucet and Mount Nuts

The pop-up drain is inserted in sink drain. Plumber’s Putty is not required because the pop-up drain has a white foam gasket:

Basement Bathroom: Pop-Up Speed Connect Sink Drain

Basement Bathroom: Pop-Up Speed Connect Sink Drain

The drain is held in place by the gray lock nut and tightened by hand against the black rubber gasket. It’s as simple as it looks!

Bathroom Vanity Sink Drain Locknut

The installed bathroom faucet and sink drain:

Bathroom Faucet and Sink Drain Installation

Bathroom Faucet and Sink Drain Installation

This is really cool – the geared end of the Speed Connect popup drain. It reminded me of a speedometer cable on a car. Moving faucet drain level rotates the gear to open and close the popup drain. It works very well.

Bathroom Sink: Speed Connect Popup Drain Cable Connector

Bathroom Sink: Speed Connect Popup Drain Cable Connector

To connect the popup drain cable, push the faucet drain lever all the way down and pull the drain body in the sink up then screw the drain cable to the drain body as shown. Check the popup drain operation by working the faucet handle.

Bathroom Sink Drain: Connect the Popup Cable to the Drain Body

Bathroom Sink Drain: Connect the Popup Cable to the Drain Body

Connect the Bathroom Sink Drain Plumbing

The sink drain PVC plumbing requires some measuring and cutting to connect the drain plumbing. I purchased a 1-1/2 inch P-trap kit from Home Depot. The purpose of the P-trap is to create a trap seal to prevents sewer gas and odors backing out of the bathroom sink drain.

Bathroom Sink Drain Plumbing: 1-1/2 inch P-Trap Kit

Bathroom Sink Drain Plumbing: 1-1/2 inch P-Trap Kit

A schematic diagram is on the back of the P-trap package.

Bathroom Sink Drain: P-Trap Diagram

Bathroom Sink Drain: P-Trap Diagram

Studor Mini Vent Sink Drain Plumbing

I’m fitting up the drain plumbing in the photo below. The P-trap is attached to the drain body of the sink and a wye section of PVC pipe. A Studor Mini-Vent (also see my article on sewer gas smell for details) prevents the P-trap from getting sucked dry by equalizing the air pressure in the pipe; and it’s required by the Building Code in most areas.

Bathroom Sink Drain Plumbing: Studor Mini Vent and PVC P-trap

Bathroom Sink Drain Plumbing: Studor Mini Vent and PVC P-trap

Measure and fitting the sink P-trap drain plumbing:

Bathroom Sink Drain Plumbing: Install the P-trap

Bathroom Sink Drain Plumbing: Install the P-trap

Another view of the bathroom sink drain P-trap and Studor air vent installation process. The various pipe and fittings are “dry fit” first and when I’m satisfied the pieces fit together, the parts are glued or screwed together:

Install the Bathroom Sink Drain Plumbing: P-trap and PVC pipe fittings

Install the Bathroom Sink Drain Plumbing: P-trap and PVC pipe fittings

A short 1-1/2 inch section of PVC pipe is cut to join the wye to the sink drain pipe in the wall:

Bathroom Sink Drain: Ready to Glue the PVC Wye to the Drain Line

Bathroom Sink Drain: Ready to Glue the PVC Wye to the Drain Line

The 1-1/2 inch female P-trap adapter (bottom of photo) is coated with purple PVC primer and ready to be glued to the wye:

Bathroom Sink Drain Plumbing: PVC Wye and P-trap Adapter

Bathroom Sink Drain Plumbing: PVC Wye and P-trap Adapter

Install the Studor Mini Vent

The Studor Mini Vent should be installed as high as practical (minimum 4 inches) above the drain pipe so there’s no chance of waste water backing up the vent pipe. The Mini Vent threads are sealed with Teflon plumbers tape and screwed into a 1-1/2 inch PVC female threaded adapter:

Bathroom Sink Drain: Install the Studor Mini Vent

Bathroom Sink Drain: Install the Studor Mini Vent

Progress thus far – Studor Mini Vent is set as high as practical above the horizontal drain line and the 1-1/2 inch female trap adapter is glued into the PVC wye:

Bathroom Sink Drain Plumbing: Studor Mini Vent, Wye and Female Trap Adapter

Bathroom Sink Drain Plumbing: Studor Mini Vent, Wye and Female Trap Adapter

Connect the Bathroom Sink Drain P-Trap

The P-trap arm is measured and marked for cutting because it’s too long. The trap tube should extend inside the PVC female trap adapter an inch or two at most:

Bathroom Sink Drain P-Trap: Measure and Cut the P-Trap Arm

Bathroom Sink Drain P-Trap: Measure and Cut the P-Trap Arm

The sink drain P-trap arm is shortened by cutting with hacksaw and deburring the pipe end. Note the P-trap assembly sequence in the photo:

  • The threaded locking ring (or nut) from the female trap adapter is placed over the P-trap arm.
  • Then white conical compression gasket from the PVC trap adapter is slipped onto the arm.
    The orientation of the cone compression gasket is critical; the wide end faces the locking ring.
Basement Bathroom Sink Drain Plumbing: P-trap Arm Assembly

Basement Bathroom Sink Drain Plumbing: P-trap Arm Assembly

The final P-trap drain assembly steps are:

  1. Insert the P-trap arm into the female trap adapter, slide the white compression gasket into place and tighten the threaded locking ring/nut.
  2. Tighten the P-trap lock ring on the vertical section of pipe to the bathroom sink popup drain (center right of photo).

The are slip nut connections make for easy adjustments for correct fit and alignment:

Bathroom Sink Drain Plumbing - Air Vent, P-Trap and Pop-Up Drain

Bathroom Sink Drain Plumbing – Air Vent, P-Trap and Pop-Up Drain

The bathroom sink drain plumbing is complete. I could connect the hot and cold water faucet hoses now, but I’ll install the baseboard first.

Install the Bathroom Vanity Baseboard

I disconnected the sink drain P-trap and moved the vanity away from the wall so I can install the baseboard trim in the corner; otherwise I wouldn’t have room to work.

Bathroom Sink Drain Plumbing Rough-in and Vanity

Bathroom Sink Drain Plumbing Rough-in and Vanity

The new baseboard is nailed to the wall studs with white finishing nails. The baseboard is fitted exactly against the sides bathroom vanity. This not only looks professional but prevents the cabinet from moving if bumped.

Basement Bathroom Baseboard and Sink Plumbing

Basement Bathroom Baseboard and Sink Plumbing

View of the baseboard fitted against the bathroom vanity cabinet.

Basement Bathroom Vanity and Baseboard

Basement Bathroom Vanity and Baseboard

Bathroom Sink Hot and Cold Water Faucet Connectors

The braided metal faucet connector is threaded onto the hot and cold water ballcock and the faucet. Use the shortest available faucet hose to minimize any chance of kinks and constrictions.

Basement Bathroom Sink: Install the Faucet Connector

Basement Bathroom Sink: Install the Faucet Connector

The faucet hoses are connected to the brass stems of the faucet. A small adjustable wrench is required to tighten the hoses:

Basement Bathroom Sink: Hot and Cold Water Faucet Connections

Basement Bathroom Sink: Hot and Cold Water Faucet Connections

The sink faucet hoses are connected to the hot and cold water supply stop valves. Then the sink drain P-trap is reconnected:

Bathroom Sink Plumbing: Faucet Connectors, Air Vent and P-trap

Bathroom Sink Plumbing: Faucet Connectors, Air Vent and P-trap

Fasten the Vanity to the Wall

Locate and mark at least one wall stud behind the vanity with a stud finder. Because I’d already hooked up the plumbing I located the studs on the wall above the sink and transferred the mark to the interior cabinet. Remove the vanity drawers if neccessary for access. Drill 1/4 inch pilot hole in the vanity back rail. Fasten the vanity cabinet to the studs with 3 inch long wood screws.

The basement bathroom sink plumbing is now complete! Turn on the water supply valves, open the faucets and check the plumbing for leaks:

Bathroom Sink Plumbing: Turn on the Water for the First Time

Bathroom Sink Plumbing: Turn on the Water for the First Time

Running the shower:

Finish a Basement Bathroom: Test the Shower

Finish a Basement Bathroom: Test the Shower

I also flushed the toilet several times. Everything worked fine.

Basement Bathroom Sewage Pump Operation

The basement bathroom drains into the sewage basin for removed by the sewage ejector pump. I left off the basin lid so I could inspect the sewage pump operation and check the PVC sewer lines for leaks. Everything was perfect!

Basement Bathroom Sewage Basin with Half Cover & Vent Pipe Disconnected

Basement Bathroom Sewage Basin with Half Cover & Vent Pipe Disconnected

The following video shows how the Liberty sewage pump operates:

  1. Water from the bathroom faucet fills the basin.
  2. The mechanical float switch turns the pump on at the high water level.
  3. The pump lifts the water out of the basin to the main sewer line overhead.
  4. The mechanical float switch turns the pump off at the low water level.
  5. The inline check-valve prevents water from draining back into the basin.

The basin only looks dirty because dirt and rainwater got into it when the house was built and open to the weather. PVC plastic shavings are floating on the water surface when I trimmed the basin outlet with a Rotozip tool.

The vanity, toilet and shower. I’ve also installed the toilet paper and towel racks:

Basement Bathroom: Vanity, Toilet and Shower

Basement Bathroom: Vanity, Toilet and Shower

The vanity light and switch installation and wiring are covered in the How to Finish a Basement Bathroom – Part 14.

Take care,

Bob Jackson

Copyright © 2014 HandymanHowTo.com   Reproduction strictly prohibited.

RedditEmailShare

, , , , , , , , ,

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply